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TINT introduces solution to quickly build UGC-driven web experiences
Original Post: http://feeds.marketingland.com/~r/mktingland/~3/PGO1N0KrZ4w/tint-introduces-solution-to-quickly-build-ugc-driven-web-experiences-263044 The new Experience Builder is a no-coding-required platform for developing web pages centered on user generated content. Please visit Marketing Land for the full article.
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The Three Step System for Keeping Clients for Three Years or Longer
Original Post: https://ducttapemarketing.com/3-step-system-for-keeping-clients/ The Three Step System for Keeping Clients for Three Years or Longer written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing Marketing Podcast with John Jantsch on the 3 Step System to Keep Clients 3 Years or Longer I’ve been a marketing consultant for many years, working with all sorts of small business owners. Not only that, but I’ve also spent a lot of time with fellow marketing consultants, having developed the Duct Tape Marketing Consultant Network. The topic of this podcast relates to any business, but especially to those in a service business or those who are marketing consultants. When you’re running this type of business, the key to success is developing a specific method for keeping clients happy and getting them increasingly better results over the years. My business took off when I realized that there was a process to doing this, and in the intervening years, I’ve created a three step system, which I share with the Consultant Network, that helps them to keep clients for three years or longer. Today, I’m going to share that process with you. 1. Develop a Repeatable Process Having a process that you can repeat and get better at is one of the secrets to scaling a consulting firm and keeping clients longer. The Duct Tape Marketing System is our repeatable system. It relies heavily on the idea of placing strategy before tactics; we call our practice strategy first. We help our clients understand who their ideal client is, what their core message and value proposition are, and then use content as the voice of that strategy. All of this is mapped out over the customer journey, or what we call the marketing hourglass. Any client that walks through our door gets a variation of this service. After that, we get into build, grow, and ignite—our terminology for our implementation steps. This allows us to have a repeatable process that isn’t simply cookie cutter. In reality, 80 percent of small businesses all need the same 80 percent of services. They just need those services applied in slightly different ways, depending on the specifics of their business and their core strengths. That is really what the consulting part of the job is; the other stuff is about implementation. Beyond the repeatable marketing system for developing your strategy, you must also have a repeatable methodology. Every client is educated the same way, converted the same way, the discovery process and research you do for the client is managed the same way. You not only have a repeatable process for getting them results, you also have a repeatable process for their experience. Our system is also built around the fact that marketing is always changing and evolving. We have 11 channels that our approach is built around. We have to understand that all of these channels exist, and our job is to look at where each business is and then see which channels make sense for them. For example, if a business has an outdated website and no social media presence, they’re not going to be ready to start a podcast. We’ve got to go back to basics with them and get those foundational steps up and running before moving on to other channels. We use the build, grow, and ignite roadmap to show a client how they’ll move down the roadmap. We charge a monthly retainer fee and can show a client exactly where we’re going to take them. A lot of consultants sell a project or specific result; we show clients how they have the ability to grow over the years if they stick with us and our broader plan for their business. 2. You Need a Consistent Flow of Leads (and a Process to Convert Them) You don’t need a ton of leads or a complicated funnel to find them, you just need to make those leads convert. You need to get to a point where 50, 60, or 80 percent of those leads see a compelling reason to hire you. A lot of consultants can get by with only a handful of clients at any given time. That means you only need to be speaking to two or three leads—as long as they’re the right leads—every month. It’s important to establish a set of funnels. Don’t just put all of your prospecting eggs in one basket. Network with strategic partners to tap into their existing set of customers and contacts. Go out and speak at relevant events and conferences, establishing yourself as a thought leader and showing to people the value that you could add to their business, should they choose to hire you. Content plays a huge role in the prospecting process. I’ve been speaking a lot recently about the value of hub pages. If you want an example for how a hub page looks in the wild, check out our local marketing guide. This page is structured in a way that looks like an online course, and it contains everything you could want to know about local marketing. A lot of this content was written long before we created this hub page, but it was scattered everywhere. We know people are looking for information about this broad topic, so we built a hub pages where we’ve taken all of our relevant content that we’ve written over the years, and structured it in a way that would be helpful for someone looking for a total crash course on the topic. Then on the page we include a content upgrade—someone looking for local marketing tips is probably interested in the local SEO checklist, too. From there, we capture their email address and are able to start a conversation that gets us on the road to nurturing that lead. Once we’ve shared information via our hub page and gotten the attention of leads with a content upgrade, we offer our Total Online Presence Audit. As a part of this audit process, we’ll look at your website and understand the message; look at the content, structure, SEO, paid leads, competitive landscape; and then provide you with a full report and recommendations on what should be your top priorities. We charge a little money for this service. And the reason we do this is because it attracts leads that have the mentality of wanting to invest in their marketing. We’re then able to use the research from the Total Online Presence Audit to put together a thoughtful, specific proposal for that business, should they choose to engage us for marketing services. This approach not only allows us to convert more people, but to also convert them to a higher priced fee. Customers get bought into wanting to really fix the problems we’ve identified, and then we’re able to convince them of the value of investing in a broader marketing strategy. 3. Have Trained Partners and an Account Team Unless you’re just doing strategy consulting and not offering any sort of implementation, you’re going to need extra hands to help you get it all done. It doesn’t make sense for you as the consultant who’s building the business to spend time on implementation for each of your clients. You need to be free to do the higher level thinking on behalf of your clients and on scaling your own business. Bringing in a team of qualified partners and an account team allows you to free up your time. And when your process is repeatable, it’s easy to delegate tasks to this team. There are components of a repeatable process that you can train outside people to do. There are so many great freelance remote workers out there; you as the consultant can do the strategic thinking, but then you can ask the account manager to deal with the more tactical work. They can also manage reporting. An account manager is able to keep track of both your clients and your partners, communicating with them on a weekly basis. You as the consultant can then stay at the strategic level, but you can remain in clients’ fields of vision each week so that they know they’re being taken care of. Bonus Step: Invest in a Mentor and Community When you’re a solopreneur, it’s important to have a community for feedback and support. You want proof that you’re not crazy, help finding new clients, and feedback on your strategy and approach. Working by yourself in a room every day can be lonely and leave you feeling disconnected. Finding a community that is doing the same thing you’re doing can be extremely valuable (both in growing your business and keeping your spirits high). If you’re a consultant and anything resonates that you’ve heard here today resonates, check out ducttape.me/discover for information on upcoming live trainings with me, where I walk you through the methodology of our Duct Tape Marketing Consultant Network. Like this show? Click on over and give us a review on iTunes, please! This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by SEMrush. SEMrush is our go-to SEO tool for everything from tracking position and ranking to doing audits to getting new ideas for generating organic traffic. They have all the important tools you need for paid traffic, social media, PR, and SEO. Check it out at SEMrush.com/partner/ducttapemarketing.
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Instagram to start showing ads in Explore tab
Original Post: http://feeds.marketingland.com/~r/mktingland/~3/r_9pM9YdDm8/instagram-to-start-showing-ads-in-explore-tab-263072 The company said it will be introducing ads in Explore “slowly and thoughtfully” in the coming months. Please visit Marketing Land for the full article.
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The Beginner’s Guide to HTML
Original Post: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Quicksprout/~3/1hmIPU5E1J4/ There are nearly 1.7 billion websites worldwide. This number continues to grow each day. What do all of these sites have in common? In one way or another, they all use some form of HTML. That’s why learning basic HTML is such a useful skill. Here’s the thing. You can definitely build a website without having to write a line of code. But with that said, once your site is live you should still know how to read and some HTML on your own. So whether you’re creating a new website, have an existing website, or you just want to learn more about coding, this is guide will serve as the perfect introduction to HTML for you. Let’s start with the basics. What exactly is HTML? This acronym stands for Hypertext Markup Language. Basically, it’s the standard format used to create web pages, web applications, and documents. This computer language is a series of code that is typically written in a text file and then saved as HTML. When viewed on a web browser, this code translates to a properly formatted blend of text and other media. HTML is behind every web page you see online, including this page that you’re reading right now. Understanding hypertext and markup language As I’ve already mentioned, HTML stands for hypertext markup language. But those words don’t mean much to most people, so I want to break them down even further so you can fully understand the definition. The word hypertext dates back more than 50 years. It was invented to describe links in a document that make it possible for a viewer to jump to another place in the document or to a completely new document. This is something that we see and use every day in the modern Internet. Here’s a visual representation of what hypertext looks like. I’m sure you’re familiar with hyperlinks, which is a form of hypertext. As you browse online, you’ll see either http:// or https:// before every web page in your web browser. This stands for hypertext transfer protocol. Markup language refers to how documents and web pages are displayed. You see words that are bold, italic, or larger on a page. But behind the scenes, the markup language is the reason why certain components appear differently on a page. Markups are characterized by tags and attributes. Most of the time these tags come in pairs. There are start tags and end tags, which are also known as opening tags and closing tags. When to use HTML HTML is the default language for all websites on the Internet. But it’s also used for various types of documents, such as ebooks. When an HTML document gets rendered by a web browser, all of the markup language and tags are hidden. The display automatically gets changed to display a reader-friendly version of the document (what you’re seeing right now). Do you need to learn HTML to create a website? The short answer is no. Unless you’re planning to build pages from scratch and pursue web development, you won’t necessarily need to know every single component of HTML. You can probably get away without knowing HTML if you’re using a CMS, website builder, or blogging platform. For example, if you’re using WordPress as your blogging CMS, the visual editor automatically translates your text to HTML. Working in the visual editor will display content similar to a standard email message or Microsoft Word document. With that said, there are times when visual editors don’t always work the way you want to. You might find yourself in a situation where you want to format something a certain way and it’s not getting displayed properly. Furthermore, your HTML also needs to be optimized for non-human readers. Search engine bots are crawling your website for indexing purposes. The way that your HTML gets read will have an impact on your SEO. Website accessibility also needs to be taken into consideration. Computers can translate web pages into sound for people with disabilities. They rely on the structure and quality of HTML for this. While the platforms on the market today make it possible to operate a website without knowing HTML, it’s still in your best interest to learn the basics. Choosing your HTML editor For those of you who are planning to create web pages using HTML, you’ll need to use an HTML editor. These editors are the best way to organize your code and keep everything clean. Editors are great because they recognize whenever a new tag is opened. These tags are automatically closed by the software, ensuring that your code doesn’t have bugs. This also limits the number of typing and keystrokes you have to make. The best HTML editors let you preview your HTML to see how the content will look from a web browser. There are tons of options online. But I’ve narrowed down a handful of the top HTML editors for you to consider. Notepad++ Sublime Text CoffeeCup HTML-Kit Atom You can also practice HTML with this free tool from W3Schools. That’s what I’m going to use to show you examples of HTML as we continue. HTML basics Before you start writing HTML, you need to understand the three main components. Tags Attributes Elements These can be described as the building blocks or foundation of HTML. Once you learn what these are and how they work, it will be easier for you to move forward. I’ll go into greater detail on each of these below. Tags In short, tags are used to distinguish HTML code from normal text. The way your document gets displayed will be based on the tag instructions. Here’s an example. Let’s say you want to make something bold. The tag for bold is <b>, which is pictured above. This compares to the text above it, which is <p>, or a standard paragraph text. Once the code is rendered, it’s displayed how we would normally see it on a web page, as you can see from the right side of the screenshot above. Now let’s say you wanted to make something italicized. The HTML tag would look like this: Pretty straightforward, right? All I’m doing is using the tags to change the way the text appears when it’s on a web page. Take a look at those tags closely. Do you notice a difference between the opening tag and closing tag? The closing tags have a slash, indicating that the italics, bold, or whatever other tag you’re using stops here. If that example above didn’t have a slash in the closing tag, anything written after it would continue to be italicized. Hyperlinks are also created with tags. Here’s what the HTML tag would look like if I wanted to hyperlink to the Quick Sprout homepage. This tag is a little bit more in-depth than the bold and italics examples. But the same concept still applies. There is an opening tag and closing tag with text in between. The way these tags are written determines what the result will look like on the web page. Every web page starts with a <!DOCTYPE html>. Then the first line of the file says <html> as well. You can see this on the three examples that I showed you above. This tells browsers how to read the code. Elements An HTML element consists of the opening tag, closing tag, and the content in between the two. So when we were going through different examples of tags, each example was a new element. For example, let’s take a look at some potential lines of HTML. When you look on the right side of the screen at the page version of this code, you see four total sentences and two paragraphs. Now, look at the HTML code on the left side of this split screen. You can see how the three different elements are identified. Elements can be simple, such as the bold example above, or they can be a bit more complex. The document above starts with an open <body> tag, and also ends with a closed </body> tag. So everything within those two tags can also be considered one element. But within that entire body, there could be dozens, hundreds, or thousands of additional elements, depending on how long and complex your content is. Attributes For the most part, tags are used to define how content is displayed in HTML. But with that said, there are times when additional information within an element needs to be added. In these instances, you would use an attribute to define a specific characteristic of the element in question. Attributes consist of two things: Name Value They are placed inside the start tag of an element. Here’s an example to show you what I mean. The attribute used here is align=”center” and it falls within the <p> opening tag. It means that whatever text comes before the closing </p> tag will have a specific characteristic defined by the attribution. In this case, the attribute said to center the text. We saw another example of this earlier when I created a hyperlink for the Quick Sprout home page. Beginner HTML cheat sheet There are thousands of different ways you can write content in HTML. But if you’re just starting out with, there’s no reason for you to learn all of them right away. Instead, I’ll show you some basic HTML tags and explain what they’re used for. Then you can practice applying them in an HTML editor. Heading tags <head> … </head> These tags are used to showcase specific information on pages such as title tags and meta tags. Proper use of heading tags can increase your search engine traffic. Title tags <title> … </title> Your title will appear within the header of the page. It will give search engine crawlers more information about the primary content of a particular page. Paragraph tags <p> … </p> You’ve seen these throughout the examples that I showed you above. They denote a new paragraph of text. Hyperlinks <a href=”link”> … </a> This tag and attribute is used to display the anchor text for hyperlinks. The full link would be written in between the quotation marks. Images <img /> Image tags are used to present image files on the page. Tables <table> … </table> This tag contains all of the information related to content in a table. It also identifies content as a table. Footers <footer> … </footer> Anything in between these tags would be in the footer block of a page. Conclusion Every website uses HTML. So if you’re building a website or currently manage a website, it’s in your best interest to know what’s going on behind the scenes of your web pages. I’m not suggesting that you should go out and start building pages from scratch without any experience as a developer. There’s really no reason for that. But you should have a basic understanding of what HTML is, how it works, and where to edit it on your website. Here’s what I suggest. Use one of the HTML editors that I showed you earlier to practice your basic coding skills. Then just go through and try to replicate some of the examples that I covered in this beginner guide. That’s the best way to get your feet wet with HTML if you don’t have any experience with it.
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Funny Festive Party Themes
Funny Festive Party Themes   Whether or not you’re planning a good evening along with the family, or possibly a rambunctious event with your buddies, your Ñhristmas get-together need a theme. In addition to why acknowledge something tedious like ‘Ñhristmas movie night’ when you can take steps completely unique and something that anyone, regardless of […]
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Pick a cooperate figure which you belive made a vital contribution towards the labor movement and to employees
Pick a cooperate figure which you belive made a vital contribution towards the labor movement and to employees Eugene V. Debs was a pioneer from the labor proper rights movement. His charisma, chatting skills in addition to energy had been an ideas to many who would follow himin the labor movement. This life is considered […]
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Social staff works when case manager for people unique in America. Understand the roles for social employee she utilizes, explain what the heck is case fx broker in sociable work What makes it important the fact that s/he utilize this00 people Very best outcome of her/his intervention p Essay Case in point
Social staff works when case manager for people unique in America. Understand the roles for social employee she utilizes, explain what the heck is case fx broker in sociable work What makes it important the fact that s/he utilize this00 people Very best outcome of her/his intervention p Essay Case in point SOCIAL The social […]
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Want money fast? Get crisis pay day loan with fast endorsement
Want money fast? Get crisis pay day loan with fast endorsement Exact exact Same time money financial loans could be offered by financial institutions who is able to fund immediately. These types of services can be obtained to shops having a presence that is physical the condition your home is. The monies provided to approved […]
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Tips and Insights from People Who’ve Built Successful Shopify Stores
Original Post: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/crazyegg/~3/M7uOBtTGiiA/ Thanks for Making Crazy Egg a Shopify App Store Staff Pick! In honor of Crazy Egg being listed as a Shopify Staff Pick from June 26 – July 3, we thought we’d take some time to share what the Crazy Egg community has learned about building an excellent business on Shopify. If you’re interested in […]
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How ransomware targets WordPress sites
Original Post: http://feeds.marketingland.com/~r/mktingland/~3/WFXN-dJ9GA8/how-ransomware-targets-wordpress-sites-262939 We know ransomware is out there but stray from best practices in keeping our sites secure. Here are five tips to ensure security is at the forefront every day. Please visit Marketing Land for the full article.
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